White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, White Bread Ceramic Plate Ceramic James Rosenquist

White Bread Ceramic Plate

Regular price
$1,157.08
Sale price
$1,157.08
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 
Shipping calculated at checkout.

Dimensions: 

Plate: 10.5" diameter; 26.7 cm

Box: 11 x 11 inches

Medium: Fine bone china ceramic plate featuring the artist's famous work. Comes in custom artist box with printed signature.

Provenance: Plate signed with official licensing information on bottom. Comes in custom artist box with printed signature. Includes gallery certificate of authenticity.

Edition: Limited Edition of 250

Year: 1964 (artwork)

Condition: New in box


ARTIST BIO

A seminal figure in the Pop art movement, James Rosenquist is best known for his colossal collage paintings of enigmatically juxtaposed fragmentary images borrowed largely from advertisements and mass media. Brought together and enlarged so as to cover entire gallery walls and overwhelm the viewer, these seemingly unrelated pictures of consumer products, weaponry, and celebrities hint at the artist's social, political, and cultural concerns. The billboard painter-turned-artist's early works are also considered emblematic of a burgeoning consumer culture in America during the 1960s. For six decades Rosenquist created massive, provocative paintings, whose continued relevance hinges on their engagement with current economic, political, environmental, and scientific issues.

The artist was among the first to directly address the persuasive, even deceptive, powers of advertising by applying the Surrealist practice of juxtaposing seemingly unrelated subjects to fragmented commercial images and ads in a manner that highlights the omnipresence of ads.

An advocate for his fellow artists, Rosenquist used his prominent artistic reputation to help lobby for federal protection of artists' rights during the 1970s and was soon thereafter appointed to the National Council on the Arts.

Because he successfully moved beyond his early fascination with popular culture and mass media to address new issues, such as the intersection of science and aesthetics, Rosenquist is credited with being one the few Pop artists whose later work continues to be relevant.